WOW #48 – Word Of The Week

WOW – Word Of The Week is a weekly feature that I came up with in the year 2015 in order to learn new words and their meaning in the English language and improve my vocabulary.

If you wish to participate and post about WOW then, by all means, feel free to do so. A link-back to this blog post would be most appreciated and also it would help me in knowing that you’ve posted your work.

WOW #48 – Word Of The Week

Word:

Eclectic

Part Of Speech:

Adjective

Derivatives:

eclectic – noun; eclectics – plural noun; eclectically – adverb

Pronunciation:

eclec·​tic |  \ i-ˈklek-tik

Meaning:

  • deriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources.
  • denoting or belonging to a class of ancient philosophers who did not belong to or found any recognized school of thought but selected doctrines from various schools of thought.
  • consisting of different types, methods, styles, etc.
  • composed of elements drawn from various sources
  • (as a noun) denoting or belonging to a class of ancient philosophers who did not belong to or found any recognised school of thought but selected doctrines from various schools of thought.
  • (as noun) a person who derives ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources.

Related Phrases:

Synonyms:

  • assorted
  • heterogeneous
  • indiscriminate
  • kitchen-sink
  • magpie
  • miscellaneous
  • mixed
  • motley
  • patchwork
  • piebald
  • promiscuous
  • raggle-taggle
  • ragtag
  • varied

Antonyms:

  • homogeneous
  • narrow
  • dogmatic

Phrases/Informal Synonyms:

Word Origin:

late 17th century (as a term in philosophy): from Greek eklektikos, from eklegein ‘pick out’, from ek ‘out’ + legein ‘choose’.

Usage Note:

Use In Sentences:

  1. In Prem’s library, you will find an eclectic mix of books because he will read just about anything.
  2. The painter’s recent work is an eclectic collection of landscapes she has recently visited.
  3. India is an eclectic and diverse country with people from various caste, religion and cultural backgrounds.

I hope you guys like this word and hope it’s useful to you in some or the other way! If you want to check out more words like this, then visit my page:

Word Treasure

A bank of all the words that have been discussed in WOW so far

10 Best Advice On Writing By Stephen King

Stephen King, for me, is the God of writing. He knows how to create believable characters that will make you feel all kinds of emotions (a wide, wide range of emotions at that), he creates genre-defining works and his stories are simply incomparable to any other on the planet (though I do know a couple of them which have been inspired by others’ stories, though he writes everything better – so he just makes them all awesome!)

When it comes to writing, I blindly follow his advice because his advice is always solid advice. He never bullshits, he never lies or tries to paint a picture other than how it is in reality; it is always straight up and eye-opening. So here is a list of 10 Best Advice On Writing By Stephen King that I always adhere to when it comes to writing my own stories and books.

10 Best Advice On Writing By Stephen King

1. “If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. There’s no way around these two things that I’m aware of, no shortcut.”

It is pretty straight-forwards advice (I told you, SK kids you not), still most writers don’t get it – the secret is to read and writer. Simple as that.

2. “You have to read widely, constantly refining (and redefining) your own work as you do so. If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write.”

This is the first advice I followed when I began writing. I simply read so much that after 500 books I already knew the deepest and the darkest secrets of writings that most writers would kill for. So read – as much as you possibly can. Read even more than you write so that when you write, you can write better.

3. “There should be no telephone in your writing room, certainly no TV or videogames for you to fool around with. If there’s a window, draw the curtains or pull down the shades unless it looks out at a blank wall.”

This is more on the lines of discipline training your brain into writing with a focused mind. While learning to develop the habit of writing, this is the one advice you NEED to follow.

4. “I think that every novelist has a single ideal reader; that at various points during the composition of a story, the writer is thinking, ‘I wonder what he/she will think when he/she reads this part?’” 

I’m sure any writer who has written more than 1L words would definitely know what this this all about. Ideal reader is what keeps a writer going and it is the best motivator, at least for me, when it comes to writing my own stories.

5. “One of the really bad things you can do to your writing is to dress up the vocabulary, looking for long words because you’re maybe a little bit ashamed of your short ones. This is like dressing up a household pet in evening clothes. The pet is embarrassed and the person who committed this act of premeditated cuteness should be even more embarrassed.”

Keep it simple, folks. Good writing is not what words you use, it is HOW you use your words.

6. “If you intend to write as truthfully as you can, your days as a member of polite society are numbered.” 

This is one of my favourites! Welcomes to the ugly part of writing 🙂

7. “I like to get ten pages a day, which amounts to 2,000 words. That’s 180,000 words over a three-month span, a goodish length for a book.”

That is how a writing habit looks like and you can see the results it produces. I try to use it as my inspiration and write at least a couple hundred words everyday (at least.) Start with 100-200 words and gradually increase as you feel comfortable settling into the habit of writing.

8. “I think the best stories always end up being about the people rather than the event, which is to say character-driven.”

The stories are always about the characters, so make sure you get your characterisation on point and your story will be good.

Related reading: 7 Types Of Characters In Fiction

9. “You cannot hope to sweep someone else away by the force of your writing until it has been done to you.”

This is why you need to read so that you can first feel the magic that writing it before you can even think of creating it yourself.

10. “Writing isn’t about making money, getting famous, getting dates, getting laid, or making friends. In the end, it’s about enriching the lives of those who will read your work, and enriching your own life, as well. It’s about getting up, getting well, and getting over. Getting happy, okay? Writing is magic, as much the water of life as any other creative art. The water is free. So drink.”

This one is deep and to put it simply don’t do it for anything but the love of writing. If you can’t live peacefully without writing, then you write. Other things are like pit-stops, not the destination or the reason for the journey in the first place. If it is not why you write, then you better not write.

So these are some savage advice from the king of Fiction himself. If you want to explore more of his AWESOME books or want to know more about him (if you still don’t know him yet) then check out the articles below, they are all pretty great:

WOW #47 – Word Of The Week

WOW – Word Of The Week is a weekly feature that I came up with in the year 2015 in order to learn new words and their meaning in the English language and improve my vocabulary.

If you wish to participate and post about WOW then, by all means, feel free to do so. A link-back to this blog post would be most appreciated and also it would help me in knowing that you’ve posted your work.

WOW #47 – Word Of The Week

Word:

Discordant

Part Of Speech:

Adjective

Derivatives:

Discordance (noun)

Pronunciation:

duh·skaw·dnt | /dɪˈskɔːd(ə)nt/

Meaning:

  • disagreeing or incongruous
  • (of sounds) harsh and jarring because of a lack of harmony
  • being at variance: Disagreeing
  • characterized by conflict

Related Phrases:

  • strike a discordant note — appear strange and out of place.
  • characterized by conflict

Synonyms:

  • conflict
  • disaccord
  • discord
  • strife
  • variance
  • friction
  • infighting
  • inharmony
  • schism
  • cacophonous

Antonyms:

  • harmonious
  • peace
  • concordance
  • musical
  • concord
  • harmony

Phrases/Informal Synonyms:

Word Origin:

Late Middle English: from Old French descordant, present participle of descorder (see discord).

Usage Note:

Use In Sentences:

  1. Something gave a loud discordant twang.
  2. The frightened cat gave a discordant shriek and jumped on top of the table.
  3. The discordant sound of the teacher’s high-pitched voice silenced the class.
  4. In the middle of the song, the piano player struck a discordant note and ruined the entire piece.

I hope you guys like this word and hope it’s useful to you in some or the other way! If you want to check out more words like this, then visit my page:

Word Treasure

A bank of all the words that have been discussed in WOW so far

WOW #46 – Word Of The Week

WOW – Word Of The Week is a weekly feature that I came up with in the year 2015 in order to learn new words and their meaning in the English language and improve my vocabulary.

If you wish to participate and post about WOW then, by all means, feel free to do so. A link-back to this blog post would be most appreciated and also it would help me in knowing that you’ve posted your work.

WOW #46 – Word Of The Week

Word:

Apathy

Part Of Speech:

Noun

Derivatives:

Pronunciation:

ah-pauh-thee-uh | /ˈapəθi/

Meaning:

  • lack of interest, enthusiasm, or concern.
  • a lack of emotional interest

Related Phrases:

Synonyms:

  • indifference
  • unconcern
  • passivity
  • detachment
  • lassitude
  • mopery
  • affectlessness
  • emotionlessness

Antonyms:

  • enthusiasm
  • interest
  • passion

Phrases/Informal Synonyms:

Word Origin:

Early 17th century: from French apathie, via Latin from Greek apatheia, from apathēs ‘without feeling’, from a-‘without’ + pathos ‘suffering’.

Usage Note:

Use In Sentences:

  • This time around, election fever appears extremely subdued — partly because of the pandemic but also from an underlying apathy. –NYT
  • After his father’s demise he sank into apathy.
  • Her apathy lead to her divorce.
  • His apathy was the cause of his mental rehabilitation.

I hope you guys like this word and hope it’s useful to you in some or the other way! If you want to check out more words like this, then visit my page:

Word Treasure

A bank of all the words that have been discussed in WOW so far

CCW Flash Fiction #3: Music In Nature by Vanshika Sahu

Crazy Cat Writers’ Flash Fiction is a Monthly Flash Fiction Challenge, where we share 2 topics every month for writers to write stories upto 1500 words. We pick one winner on each topic and publish the winners for each topic on the Crazy Cat Writer blog on the 15th and the 30th of each month.

In order to participate, join our group Crazy Cat Writers on Telegram and submit your pieces at crazycatwriter3@gmail.com.

Rules of participation:

  1. You have to be a part of Crazy Cat Writers Writing Group in order to be able to participate.
  2. The story can be on or revolve around the topic provided (it is okay even if you mention the topic in the story more than 5 times too without actually making it the focus.)
  3. The story has to be a creative fiction or non-fiction piece (NO ARTICLES)
  4. The story has to be under 1500 words.
  5. You can submit one story per topic only.
  6. Anyone can win multiple times if their stories are good.
  7. Please try to keep your stories PG 13. If they are not, then don’t forget to add warning of 18+ in advance.
  8. If your story has triggers or is about hard subject matters, then don’t forget to include a trigger warning.

Music In Nature

Tears were dripping from my eyes. Eventually I was lost in his thoughts, I was day dreaming about him. Five years of relationship ended in 5 second. I found myself in guilt and pain’s ride. Sometimes I thought heart breaks hurts the most. I felt lonely and lost again. Once again, I was at the same turn, I couldn’t find my path. I couldn’t move, all I was waiting for him to come back. But I had to choose a path – for my happiness; for myself.

I promised myself not to look back. I started ignoring my thoughts and grab the phone from side table. I started scrolling through it to unleash my pain. Eventually I played our favorite song, no matter how I tried not listen that. I played it for last time, I took a deep breath and closed my eyes. I felt the lyrics and my heartbeats started synchronized with melody. For a minute I was lost in it. I opened my eyes and found myself smiling. I felt fresh and alive once again.

I opened my laptop and started writing….

For me Music is feeling,

Feeling of being lost, 

Lost in thoughts of freedom,

Freedom from pain,

Pain of holding grudges,

Later I found music as a medicine,

Medicine given by nature,

Chirping birds, Dripping water,

Blowing winds and flowing river,

Music doesn’t belong to beats,

Real music found in deep dark World,

Where it brings lights and happiness,

I decided to kept in my mind,

Melodies in my Heartbeats,

AND lyrics in my soul….


About The Writer

Vanshika Sahu

I am law 3rd year law student and a part time content write. A small business owner of shri_aparajitha. Love to pen down my feelings. Currently, Working on fiction story.

You can find Ramcharan on:
Instagram

WOW #45 – Word Of The Week

WOW – Word Of The Week is a weekly feature that I came up with in the year 2015 in order to learn new words and their meaning in the English language and improve my vocabulary.

If you wish to participate and post about WOW then, by all means, feel free to do so. A link-back to this blog post would be most appreciated and also it would help me in knowing that you’ve posted your work.

Picking up where I left off, this is going to be the 45th word for this feature.

WOW #45 – Word Of The Week

Word:

inchoate

Part Of Speech:

Adjective

Derivatives:

Pronunciation:

in·​cho·​ate | \ in-ˈkō-ət

Meaning:

  • being only partly in existence or operation
  • imperfectly formed or formulated
  • just begun and so not fully formed or developed
  • confused or incoherent

Related Phrases:

An inchoate offence, preliminary crime, inchoate crime or incomplete crime is a crime of preparing for or seeking to commit another crime.

The most common example of an inchoate offence is “attempt”.

Synonyms:

  • amorphous
  • elementary
  • embryonic
  • formless
  • immature
  • imperfect
  • incipient
  • preliminary
  • rudimentary
  • shapeless
  • unfinished
  • unformed
  • inceptive
  • unshaped
  • nascent

Antonyms:

Phrases/Informal Synonyms:

Word Origin:

Mid 16th century: from Latin inchoates, past participle of inchoare, variant of incohare ‘begin’.

Usage Note:

This word is most commonly used in relation to legal jargon therefore you can find it in various legal documentation.

Use In Sentences:

  • The reception seemed to me rather inchoate not to say disorderly.
  • They were inchoate proletarian protests.
  • He had a child’s inchoate awareness of their language
  • Her dreams were senseless and inchoate.

I hope you guys like this word and hope it’s useful to you in some or the other way! If you want to check out more words like this, then visit my page:

Word Treasure

A bank of all the words that have been discussed in WOW so far

CCW Flash Fiction #2: A Short Poem by Ramcharan Modumpally

Crazy Cat Writers’ Flash Fiction is a Monthly Flash Fiction Challenge, where we share 2 topics every month for writers to write stories upto 1500 words. We pick one winner on each topic and publish the winners for each topic on the Crazy Cat Writer blog on the 15th and the 30th of each month.

In order to participate, join our group Crazy Cat Writers on Telegram and submit your pieces at crazycatwriter3@gmail.com.

Rules of participation:

  1. You have to be a part of Crazy Cat Writers Writing Group in order to be able to participate.
  2. The story can be on or revolve around the topic provided (it is okay even if you mention the topic in the story more than 5 times too without actually making it the focus.)
  3. The story has to be a creative fiction or non-fiction piece (NO ARTICLES)
  4. The story has to be under 1500 words.
  5. You can submit one story per topic only.
  6. Anyone can win multiple times if their stories are good.
  7. Please try to keep your stories PG 13. If they are not, then don’t forget to add warning of 18+ in advance.
  8. If your story has triggers or is about hard subject matters, then don’t forget to include a trigger warning.

A Short Poem

I thought of writing a few lines on this auspicious mother’s day….

But I failed, I tried again and failed, and again and again failed…

Finally concluded…

Through which word I can express sweetness other than mom….

Through which word I can express the feeling of being safe other than mom…..

Through which word I can express actual sacrifice other than mom…..

Through which word I can express first and best loving teacher other than mom..

Through which word I can express the meaning of  genuine love other than mom….

Through which words I can express strength and support other than mom….

For the women who can mix food with love, who empathizes with me in every problem, whose stomach gets full when I ate, who will be in Cloud 9 when I achieve something…. I believe the oxford dictionary may fall short of words if I try to describe her greatness.

If any such word exists in all languages with millions of emotions, then that definitely will be a mother.Happy Mother’s Day Amma


About The Writer

Ramcharan Modumpally

A passionate fiction novel writer who is currently working on a page called late night thinkers, with 200+ quotes alongside a mechanical engineer, 2d animator, customer support executive with 2 years of experience, blogging learner.

You can find Ramcharan on:
Facebook | Instagram | Blog

5 Tips To Write Great Sentences

Everyone wants to write great prose, but most fo the times they ignore the very thing that makes up the prose itself – sentences!

In order to write great prose, you need to be able to write great sentences and in order to write great sentences, first you need to know what kind of sentences are there. Read this article to first learn about the 3 Types Of Sentences That All Fiction Writers Must Know.

Once you know the 3 basic types of sentences, move on and read the following tips on writing great sentences for fiction and other creative works.

5 Tips For Writers To Write Great Sentences

1. Express an idea in every sentence

You sentence should be meaningful. It should express, question, inform, or explain something. If it doesn’t do any of these things, then reconsider cutting it out all together. Every sentence needs to make sense and should be relevant in writing.

2. Vary sentence pattern and lengths

Use different lengths, approaches, techniques to make a point by repetition, but make sure not to make it too obvious. Readers hate monotony, so keep your readers entertained by mixing up different kinds of sentences and providing a healthy dose of variety.

3. Use strong verbs

This will eliminate the need to use unnecessary adverbs and adjectives in the sentences giving you cleaner and sharper sentences.

4. Combine sentences

Try and combine sentences to add variety to your prose. Don’t just use a single kind of sentences, try the different kind of them and in different ways, using varying verbs, conjugation, structures, etc.

5. Avoid Passive Voice and make use of Active Voice

This will also make your readers feel a part of your story rather than feeling out of the loop. Passive voice is boring and starts to go stale too fast, so use active voice in order to engage your readers.


I hope this helps you in writing better sentences, and as a result, better prose.

If you want to learn more about writing fiction then check out these articles:

3 Types Of Sentences That All Fiction Writers Must Know

Most of the writers, especially ESL Writers – English as Second Language Writers, face the problems of creative effective, sentences with great flow while writing a fictional story. On the surface it may not seem like a big problem, but when you really think about it, a sentence is practically the most basic unit in a novel, so how do you think sentences won’t have an effect on the overall narrative? Not paying enough attention to each and every sentence is what leads to bad writing!

In order to make it easier, I am beginning with the most basic types of sentences before explaining the topics of Fragmented Sentences and Run-On Sentences.

3 Types Of Sentences That All Fiction Writers Must Know

1. Simple Sentence

A Simple Sentence is a sentence consisting of only one clause, with a single subject and predicate.

So a Simple Sentence should have these basic 3 things: A subject, a verb and should make a complete thought.

Examples of Simple Sentences:

  1. Do you play piano?
  2. The bus leaves every morning at 5:00 AM.
  3. Water freezes at 0°C.
  4. I love my cat.

2. Compound Sentence

A Compound Sentence is a sentence consisting of two or more verbs and two or more simple sentences joined by a conjunction.

So a Compound Sentence must have 3 things: 2 or more verbs, 2 or more simple sentences and at least one conjunction.

Examples of Compound Sentences:

  1. I like coffee, and Seema likes tea.
  2. Suzan went to work, but Sid went to the party, and I went home.
  3. Our car broke down and we came last.
  4. You can go for the Yoga class and I will go to the gym.

3. Complex Sentences

Complex Sentence is formed by adding one or more subordinate or dependent clauses to the main or independent clause using conjunctions and/or relative pronouns.

NOTE: A clause is a simple sentence.

Examples of Complex Sentences:

  1. Because my tea was too cold, I heated it in on the stove.
  2. Although she was wealthy, she was still unhappy.
  3. They returned the computer after they noticed it was damaged.
  4. Whenever prices go up, customers buy less products.

Workshop Alert: Introduction To Fiction Writing (June 2021) 5-Day Workshop – India

Hello guys, I am back with another workshop as some students wanted me to have a morning batch for the last workshop. So here it is:

Details of the course:

Fees: Rs.1000 per student
Date: 1st June to 5th June
Time: 11:00 am to 1:00 pm
Platform: Zoom
Session recordings: Available on Request
Certification: by Citrus Publishers (upon completion of assignment)

Topics Covered:

Day-1:

  • Introduction to Creative Writing & Fiction Writing
  • Genres in literature
  • Discovering The Writer Within
  • Ways of writing and the best way to write
  • WHAT to write – finding and developing ideas
  • Important Terminologies
  • Important Literary Devices
  • Writing Styles
  • Literary Themes

Day-2:

  • Understanding Drafts
  • Importance of First Draft & Second Draft
  • Exposition, Narration & Point Of Views
  • Elements Of Fiction Writing
  • Tools Of Fiction Writing
  • Understanding Plotting a story
  • Elements of Plot Structure
  • Aristotle’s Basic Story Structure & 3 Traditional Plot Structures

Day-3:

  • Characterisation basics
  • Types of different characters
  • Character as per their narrative function
  • Character arcs
  • Inner Conflicts
  • Character Motivation and Stakes
  • Character Backstory
  • Profiling the characters

Day-4:

  • The technique of ‘Show, don’t Tell’
  • External conflict & Point Of Views
  • Dialogue writing basics
  • Understanding Pacing & Tension
  • Structuring a scene
  • Conflict, Resolution and Ending
  • Self-Revising
  • Self-Editing
  • My Story Framework

Day-5:

  • Elementary rules of Fiction Writing
  • How to improve your writing
  • Reading like a writer to improve your writing
  • Writing-Related Concepts: Freewriting, Morning Words or Pages, Blank Page Syndrome, Prompt-Writing, Idea Journal & Writing Rituals
  • Biggest Insecurities faced by Writers & Security Blanket For Writers
  • Techniques of planning: MindMapping and Brainstorming for Writing

Registration is free!

So register today and join the Workshop Group to start practicing the writing exercises with me!

Guided Writing Groups – Write With Me

I present to you Guided Writing Groups – 3 Tiers of Exclusive Writing Groups!

In all the workshops I’ve conducted and having spoken to over a 100 budding writers, the main problem with each and everyone’s writing, that I have been able to identify so far are two: lack of motivation (or simply not knowing what to write) and lack of feedback (not knowing where they can improve and get better.)

For this, I have come up with the perfect solution that will not only help the writers interested in improving their craft and writing more by developing a habit out of it but also by leaning new things related to the craft.

Read on to find out how these groups work on different levels and how you can benefit from them:

Guided Writing Group by Heena R. Pardeshi

Guided Writing Group – Basic Level

What does it include:

  • 1 specially curated weekly writing story topic (4 topics in total) – basic level
  • Feedback on all the 4 stories
  • Doubt-clearing related to all 4 stories through email
  • Exclusive channel on Telegram only for paid members. Doubt-clearing and story submission through email.
  • The story prompts will be a mix of different formats of prompts that will help you explore the depths of your creativity.

Rs.350 per month

Guided Writing Group- Intermediate Level

What does it include:

  • Specially curated weekly writing story topics (4 topics in total) – intermediate level
  • Feedback/critique on all the 4 stories
  • Doubt-clearing related to all 4 stories
  • 1/2 hour lecture on one writing-related topic every month. The topic will be different every month and will be taught over Google Meet.
  • Exclusive channel on Telegram only for paid members.
  • Doubt-clearing through email & WhatsApp
  • Story submission through email.
  • The story prompts will be a mix of different formats of prompts that will help you explore the depths of your creativity.

Rs.800 per month

Guided Writing Group- Intermediate Level

What does it include:

  • 1 specially curated weekly writing prompt/topic (4 topics in total) – advance level
  • Detailed critique and feedback on all the 4 stories
  • Doubt-clearing related to all the 4 stories over a video call
  • 1-hour lecture on one writing-related topic every month on Google Meet
  • 1/2 hour personal online writing consultation for each student over a video call
  • Exclusive channel on Telegram only for paid members.
  • Doubt-clearing through email, WhatsApp and video call
  • Story submission through email.
  • The story prompts will be a mix of different formats of prompts that will help you explore the depths of your creativity.
  • The writing-related topic that will be taught will be different every month.
  • The writing consultation would be conducted over a video call as per your availability.

Rs.1500 per month

If you wish to join any of my Guided Writing Groups then please fill the form below and I’ll get back to you as soon as I can:

CCW Flash Fiction #1: Mother’s Day Poem by Simran Hirani

Crazy Cat Writers’ Flash Fiction is a Monthly Flash Fiction Challenge, where we share 2 topics every month for writers to write stories upto 1500 words. We pick one winner on each topic and publish the winners for each topic on the Crazy Cat Writer blog on the 15th and the 30th of each month.

In order to participate, join our group Crazy Cat Writers on Telegram and submit your pieces at crazycatwriter3@gmail.com.

Rules of participation:

  1. You have to be a part of Crazy Cat Writers Writing Group in order to be able to participate.
  2. The story can be on or revolve around the topic provided (it is okay even if you mention the topic in the story more than 5 times too without actually making it the focus.)
  3. The story has to be a creative fiction or non-fiction piece (NO ARTICLES)
  4. The story has to be under 1500 words.
  5. You can submit one story per topic only.
  6. Anyone can win multiple times if their stories are good.
  7. Please try to keep your stories PG 13. If they are not, then don’t forget to add warning of 18+ in advance.
  8. If your story has triggers or is about hard subject matters, then don’t forget to include a trigger warning.

Mother’s Day Poem

page1image15420464

On a cold wintry morning,

I wake up see her right beside me sound asleep,

I tuck myself into her blanket and wish her Happy Mothers day Mom.

I don’t think these 18years would have been possible without you in it

It’s you who has given me strength whenever I’d lost faith in myself,

It’s you who has always been the first one to congratulate me for all my achievements.

It’s you with whom I feel safe and protected.

I still remember the time when you were sick but you’d still cook for the family,

I still remember the time when you would cook extra chapatis for school so that I can share it with my friends,

I still remember the day when it was the first day of school and I was crying and weeping but you had to let me go as I’d need to stand strong and tough.

Often I say things which I don’t mean,

At times I even annoy you and yell at you, But no matter what happens no one can replace you.

I just want to thank you,

For your wisdom, your encouragement and showering your love all these years. Happy Mothers day to all the mothers out there!

-Simran Hirani


About The Writer

Simran Hirani

I am an 18 year old highschool student residing in Jaipur, Rajasthan. I am an Avid reader and a big time foodie. Growing up I have almost wanted to explore every possible field I could wheater it was dancing or playing sports but writing is something that has always stuck with me. 

It was during the quarantine, I started taking writing seriously  as a hobby to fritter my time away but as the months passed by I have really begun to enjoy it and keen on learning further in this field. 

I believe that writing allows to break all barriers, cross all the boundaries, travel the whole world yet stay at the same place. To me writng is an escape from the reality and chaos that surround us.

I aim to study literature and journalism in future and write children’s books in future one day.

You can find Simran on:
Her blog and Instagram

CCW Flash Fiction Writing

Crazy Cat Writers’ (CCW) Flash Fiction is a Monthly Flash Fiction Challenge, where we share 2 topics every month for writers to write stories upto 1500 words. We pick one winner on each topic and publish the winners for each topic on the Crazy Cat Writer blog on the 15th and the 30th of each month.

In order to participate, join our group Crazy Cat Writers on Telegram and or WhatsApp and submit your pieces at crazycatwriter3@gmail.com.

Rules of participation:

  1. You have to be a part of Crazy Cat Writers Writing Group in order to be able to participate.
  2. The story can be on or revolve around the topic provided (it is okay even if you mention the topic in the story more than 5 times too without actually making it the focus.)
  3. The story has to be a creative fiction or non-fiction piece (NO ARTICLES)
  4. The story has to be under 1500 words.
  5. You can submit one story per topic only.
  6. Anyone can win multiple times if their stories are good.
  7. Please try to keep your stories PG 13. If they are not, then don’t forget to add warning of 18+ in advance.
  8. If your story has triggers or is about hard subject matters, then don’t forget to include a trigger warning.
  9. Always provide credit for the images you submit with the story or simply use images from Pixabay.

Join us today and begin your writing adventure!

3-Day Free Workshop With Skill India, MESC and Vidya Daan

Hello guys, I am thrilled and elated to announce my 3-day workshop in association with Skill India, MESC India and Vidya Daan program.

Here are the details of this workshop:

Media & Entertainment Skills Council invites you for *Creative Warriors* online workshop, powered by *Vidyadaan* , on “Introduction to Fiction Writing” by *Ms. Heena R. Pradeshi,* a Fiction Author.

Date: 17-19 May 2021
Time:12:30 PM
Topic : Introduction to Fiction Writing
Registration Link: https://bit.ly/33GL6WB

*_TOPICS TO BE COVERED:_* 

*Day 1* 
– What is Fiction Writing 
– Different genres in Fiction Writing
– How to start writing stories
– How to find ideas and how to maintain them
– How to develop ideas for a story
– Fiction Writing elements
– Fiction Writing Tools

*Day 2* 
– How to plot a story
– Basics of plotting a story
– Description Vs Narration Vs exposition
– Characterisation in Fiction Writing 

*Day 3* 
– How to develop a writing habit 
– Importance of reading in fiction writing 
– Reading like a writer
– Writing concepts – Idea Journal, morning words, Writers’ block, Writing Rituals Etc.

10 Basic Punctuations For Writers

Let’s face it, as writers, we have all been in a situation where we have written something really good (maybe even out-of-this-world amazing) and have asked a friend, colleague or a family member to read it only to find out that you’ve messed up in punctuations! It is not that you don’t know which punctuations are to be used where, it is simply an error that all writers make because of being engrossed in their story too much to not have enough time to pay attention to the other “non-essential” things.

I know you are probably remembering that one embarrassing moment (probably more) where you were in this kind of a fix. Well, in order to make sure that you or I don’t end up in this kind of mess again, I thought it was a good idea to prepare a list for the basic punctuations to just go over once you have completed your story – kind of a checklist.

Basic Punctuations For Writers

1. Full stop or Period

Full stop (in British English) or period (in American English) is used to mark the end of a sentence. It is the most basic punctuation is used to end a sentence. You can use it to determine the length of your sentence in narrative fiction.

Ending sentences: Full stops indicate the end of sentences that are not questions or exclamations.

Abbreviations: A full stop is used after some abbreviations. If the abbreviation ends a declaratory sentence there is no additional period immediately following the full stop that ends the abbreviation (e.g. “My name is Gabriel Gama, Jr.”). Though two full stops (one for the abbreviation, one for the sentence ending) might be expected, conventionally only one is written.
In British English, if the abbreviation includes both the first and last letter of the abbreviated word, as in ‘Mister’ [‘Mr’] and ‘Doctor’ [‘Dr’], a full stop is not used. In American English, the common convention is to include the period after all such abbreviations.

In conversation: In British English, the words “full stop” at the end of an utterance strengthen it, it admits of no discussion: “I’m not going with you, full stop.” In American English, the word “period” serves this function.

2. Comma

Comma, in English language is used mainly to separate parts of a sentence such as clauses and items in lists, mainly when there are three or more items listed. 

Clauses: A comma is used to separate a dependent clause from the independent clause if the dependent clause comes first: After I fed the cat, I brushed my clothes. 

Adverbs: Commas are always used to set off certain adverbs at the beginning of a sentence, including howeverin factthereforeneverthelessmoreoverfurthermore, and still. Using commas to offset certain adverbs is optional, including thensoyetinstead, and too.

Parenthetical phrases: Commas are often used to enclose parenthetical words and phrases within a sentence. Such phrases are both preceded and followed by a comma, unless that would result in a doubling of punctuation marks or the parenthetical is at the start or end of the sentence. The following are examples of types of parenthetical phrases:

  • Introductory phrase: Once upon a time, my father ate a muffin.
  • Interjection: My father ate the muffin, gosh darn it!
  • Aside: My father, if you don’t mind me telling you this, ate the muffin.
  • Appositive: My father, a jaded and bitter man, ate the muffin.
  • Absolute phrase: My father, his eyes flashing with rage, ate the muffin.
  • Free modifier: My father, chewing with unbridled fury, ate the muffin.
  • Resumptive modifier: My father ate the muffin, a muffin which no man had yet chewed.
  • Summative modifier: My father ate the muffin, a feat which no man had attempted.

Quotations: Mostly in fiction writing, writers precede quoted material that is the grammatical object of an active verb of speaking or writing with a comma, as in Mr. Kershner says, “You should know how to use a comma.”

The comma and the quotation mark can be paired in two ways: In British English, punctuation is usually placed within quotation marks only if it is part of what is being quoted or referred to – My mother gave me the nickname “Bobby Bobby Bob Bob Boy”, which really made me angry.

In American English, the comma is commonly included inside a quotation mark – My mother gave me the nickname “Bobby Bobby Bob Bob Boy,” which really made me angry.

3. Question mark

A question mark is a punctuation mark that indicates an interrogative clause or phrase.

4. Exclamation point

The exclamation mark, also referred to as the exclamation point in American English, is a punctuation mark usually used after an interjection or exclamation to indicate strong feelings or high volume (shouting), or to show emphasis. The exclamation mark often marks the end of a sentence, for example: “Watch out!” Similarly, a bare exclamation mark (with nothing before or after) is often established in warning signs.

A sentence ending in an exclamation mark may represent an exclamation or an interjection (such as “Wow!”, “Boo!”), or an imperative (“Stop!”), or may indicate astonishment or surprise: “They were the footprints of a gigantic hound!” Exclamation marks are occasionally placed mid-sentence with a function similar to a comma, for dramatic effect, although this usage is obsolete: “On the walk, oh! there was a frightful noise.”

Informally, exclamation marks may be repeated for additional emphasis (“That’s great!!!”), but this practice is generally considered unacceptable in formal prose.

The exclamation mark is sometimes used in conjunction with the question mark. This can be in protest or astonishment (“Out of all places, the squatter-camp?!”); a few writers replace this with a single, nonstandard punctuation mark, the interrobang, which is the combination of a question mark and an exclamation mark.

NOTE:

Overly frequent use of the exclamation mark is generally considered poor writing, for it distracts the reader and devalues the mark’s significance.

Cut out all these exclamation points… An exclamation point is like laughing at your own joke.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

5. Apostrophe

The apostrophe ( or ) is a punctuation mark that it is used for three purposes in English llanguage:

  1. The marking of the omission of one or more letters (as in the contraction of “do not” to “don’t”).
  2. The marking of possessive case of nouns (as in “the eagle’s feathers”, “in one month’s time”, “at your parents’‌ home”).
  3. The marking of plurals of individual characters (e.g. “p’s and q’s”).

Rules for most situations

  • Possessive personal pronouns, serving as either noun-equivalents or adjective-equivalents, do not use an apostrophe, even when they end in “s”. The complete list of those ending in the letter “s” or the corresponding sound /s/ or /z/ but not taking an apostrophe is ours, yours, his, hers, its, theirs, and whose.
  • Other pronouns, singular nouns not ending in “s”, and plural nouns not ending in “s” all take “‘s” in the possessive: e.g., someone’s, a cat’s toys, women’s.
  • Plural nouns already ending in “s” take only an apostrophe after the pre-existing “s” to form the possessive: e.g., three cats’ toys.

6. Colon

The colon (:) is a punctuation mark consisting of two equally sized dots placed one above the other on the same vertical line. A colon often precedes an explanation, a list, a quotation, or a block quotation. It is also used between hours and minutes in time, titles and subtitles of books, city and publisher in citations, chapter and verse in biblical citations, and for salutations in business letters and other formal letter writing.

Colon used before list: Daequan was so hungry that he ate everything in the house: chips, cold pizza, pretzels and dip, hot dogs, peanut butter, and candy.

Colon used before a description: Bertha is so desperate that she’ll date anyone, even William: he’s uglier than a squashed toad on the highway, and that’s on his good days.

Colon before definition: For years while I was reading Shakespeare’s Othello and criticism on it, I had to constantly look up the word “egregious” since the villain uses that word: outstandingly bad or shocking.

Colon before explanation: I guess I can say I had a rough weekend: I had chest pain and spent all Saturday and Sunday in the emergency room.

Some writers use fragments (incomplete sentences) before a colon for emphasis or stylistic preferences (to show a character’s voice in literature), as in this example: Dinner: chips and juice. What a well-rounded diet I have.

7. Semi-colon

In the English language, a semicolon, or semi-colon, is most commonly used to link (in a single sentence) two independent clauses that are closely related in thought. When a semicolon joins two or more ideas in one sentence, those ideas are then given equal rank. Semicolons can also be used in place of commas to separate the items in a list, particularly when the elements of that list contain commas.

The semicolon is likely the least understood of the standard marks, and so it is not used by many English speakers.

Although terminal marks (i.e. full stops, exclamation marks, and question marks) indicate the end of a sentence, the comma, semicolon, and colon are normally sentence-internal, making them secondary boundary marks. The semicolon falls between terminal marks and the comma; its strength is equal to that of the colon.

Applications of the semicolon in English include:

  • Between items in a series or listing containing internal punctuation, especially parenthetic commas, where the semicolons function as serial commas. The semicolon divides the items on the list to more discrete parts, without which the remaining jumble of commas could cause confusion for the reader. This is sometimes called the “super comma” function of the semicolon:
    • The people present were Jamie, a man from New Zealand; John, the milkman’s son; and George, a gaunt kind of man with no friends.
    • Several fast food restaurants can be found within the following cities: London, England; Paris, France; Dublin, Ireland; and Madrid, Spain.
    • Here are three examples of familiar sequences: one, two, and three; a, b, and c; first, second, and third.
  • Between closely related independent clauses not conjoined with a coordinating conjunction, when the two clauses are balanced, opposed or contradictory:
    • My wife would like tea; I would prefer coffee.
    • I went to the basketball court; I was told it was closed for cleaning.
    • I told Kate she’s running for the hills; I wonder if she knew I was joking.
  • In rare instances, when a comma replaces a period (full stop) in a quotation, or when a quotation otherwise links two independent sentences:
    • “I have no use for this,” he said; “you are welcome to it.”
    • “Is this your book?” she asked; “I found it on the floor.”

8. Quotation marks

Quotation marks, also known as quotesquote marksspeech marksinverted commas, or talking marks,are punctuation marks used in pairs in various writing systems to set off direct speech, a quotation, or a phrase. The pair consists of an opening quotation mark and a closing quotation mark, which may or may not be the same character.

In English writing, quotation marks are placed in pairs around a word or phrase to indicate:

  • Quotation or direct speech: Carol said “Go ahead” when I asked her if the launcher was ready.
  • Mention in another work of the title of a short or subsidiary work, such as a chapter or an episode: “Encounter at Farpoint” was the pilot episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation.
  • Scare quotes, used to mean “so-called” or to express irony: The “fresh” bread was all dried up.

In American writing, quotation marks are normally the double kind (the primary style). If quotation marks are used inside another pair of quotation marks, then single quotation marks are used. For example: “Didn’t she say ‘I like red best’ when I asked her wine preferences?” he asked his guests. If another set of quotation marks is nested inside single quotation marks, double quotation marks are used again, and they continue to alternate as necessary (though this is rarely done).

British publishing is regarded as more flexible about whether double or single quotation marks should be used. A tendency to use single quotation marks in British writing is thought to have arisen after the mid-19th century invention of steam-powered presses and the consequent rise of London and New York as distinct, industrialized publishing centers whose publishing houses adhered to separate norms. However, The King’s English in 1908 noted that the prevailing British practice was to use double marks for most purposes, and single ones for quotations within quotations. Different media now follow different conventions in the United Kingdom.

9. Paranthesis

Parentheses (also called simply brackets) contain adjunctive material that serves to clarify (in the manner of a gloss) or is aside from the main point. A milder effect may be obtained by using a pair of commas as the delimiter, though if the sentence contains commas for other purposes, visual confusion may result. That issue is fixed by using a pair of dashes instead, to bracket the parenthetical.

In American usage, parentheses are usually considered separate from other brackets, and calling them “brackets” is unusual.

Parentheses may be used in formal writing to add supplementary information, such as “Sen. John McCain (R – Arizona) spoke at length”. They can also indicate shorthand for “either singular or plural” for nouns, e.g. “the claim(s)”. It can also be used for gender neutral language, especially in languages with grammatical gender, e.g. “(s)he agreed with his/her physician” (the slash in the second instance, as one alternative is replacing the other, not adding to it).

Parenthetical phrases have been used extensively in informal writing and stream of consciousness literature. Examples include the southern American author William Faulkner (see Absalom, Absalom! and the Quentin section of The Sound and the Fury) as well as poet E. E. Cummings.

Note: Parentheses have historically been used where the dash is currently used in alternatives.

10. Hyphen

The hyphen is a punctuation mark used to join words and to separate syllables of a single word. The use of hyphens is called hyphenation. Son-in-law is an example of a hyphenated word. The hyphen is sometimes confused with dashes (figure dash ‒, en dash –, em dash —, horizontal bar―), which are longer and have different uses.

Although hyphens are not to be confused with en dashes, there are some overlaps in usage (in which either a hyphen or an en dash may be acceptable, depending on user preference.


So next time you write a story, all you have to do it just go through this list and make sure that your punctuations are in the right place.

Do’s And Don’ts Of Online Workshops or Classes For Students

Since the pandemic hit the world in early 2020, we all have been too dependent on the online learning system that is now a part of our daily routine. People of all ages and sex take up online classes and workshops to learn new skills, crafts, languages and to obtain some kind of education. But let us all be honest, we all, especially Indians, were not entirely prepared for this extreme transition to online workshops and classes and therefore when the time came, most found themselves to be ill-equipped in knowing what to do and what not to in these online sessions.

I am here with a handy guide of do’s and don’ts so that you won’t have to look around or wonder about what to do and what to not to before, during or after an online class/workshop/consultation or session.

In case you didn’t know, I provide an Online Writing Consultation service to help writers who either want to learn something specific or who are stuck in their fiction projects.

Do’s & Don’ts Of Online Workshop or Classes

1. Be Punctual

Make sure to log in 5-10 minutes before the class begins. Open the platform and wait for the instructor or an admin to log in and then join the group/meet.

2. Be Ready

Have your device – laptop or mobile, fully charged and possibly clutter-free (delete the unnecessary files or transfer them to a hard drive) so that it will run smoothly without heating up and won’t hang during your class.

Also, keep a backup device ready, just in case something goes wrong in the middle of the class with your device.

3. Be Presentable

Dress appropriately and be ready to switch on your camera at the last minute notice. Many times in online classes people get into awkward situations when the instructor asks the entire class to switch on their cameras.

Also, make sure to sit in a quiet place. If you have kids or pets at home, then sit in a room where you can shut the door and attend the class without being disturbed or worse disturbing the entire class.

4. Don’t be a ghost

Don’t ghost your online class. If you are late in joining the class then message the instructor personally to let them know that you will be late. It is considered impolite to join the meeting at any time without having previously informed the instructor.

5. Greet everyone and introduce yourself

Many times people forget their most distinguished etiquettes when we attend an online class, take special care not to do it. Imagine going to a physical workshop/class and greet others and introduce yourself just like you wind in an offline class.

6. Don’t take unnecessary breaks

All online classes have breaks in between so try and not take your own breaks because either you’ll end up missing out on some topic or you’ll delay the entire class. A couple of things you can do to prevent such situation are:
1) Go to the restroom just before the class begins so that you can sit comfortably in the class till the official break.
2) Sit with a bottle of water so that you won’t have to get up again and again for it.
3) Sit with a prepared cup of coffee and some light snacks so that you won’t have to get up for anything.

7. Don’t depend on the course notes

Keep a notebook and pen ready for taking down notes throughout the class. The class notes will contain only the most important information but there will be a million small things that the instructor might teach or cover or mention that you might find useful and important. So always take your notes.

8. Be responsive

Respond to the instructor with comments/messages such as ‘yes,’ ‘understood,’ ‘very well,’ etc. It helps the teacher in knowing that everyone is listening and understanding, especially when the cameras are off.

9. Don’t be rude

If you have a doubt or a question, wait for the teacher to finish speaking or explaining a topic and then drop a message saying you have a doubt. The teacher will ask you to ‘unmute’ yourself and ask. If not, then you can ‘unmute’ yourself after a topic is over, and say ‘excuse me sir/mam, I have a doubt/question.’

Don’t interrupt the teacher or the other students when they are talking or clearing doubts.

10. Don’t be distracted during the class

Don’t watch videos, serials or memes in the middle of the class. Be focused!

Remember these things and you’re all set to attend your next online workshop or class.

And don’t forget to wave ‘goodbye’ or say ‘bye and thank you’ before signing off from the class.

8 Tips For Renting A House

Renting a house is not that easy a task as it may seem on the surface. For someone like me who’s moved in and out of a fair share of rented apartments as well as bungalows, I know that renting a house does not only take careful consideration of more than a dozen things but also requires proper planning and organisation to make THE MOVE as smooth as possible and, not to forget, convenient for everyone in the family.

Especially in these times of social-distancing and the entire world economy suffering because of the global Corona pandemic, one needs to be smart and vigilant while hunting, finalising as well as sealing the rent agreement and moving in.

Thankfully, because of the modern technology and the internet, various sources are available at one’s disposal to make the entire process as simplified and less strenuous as can be.

Here are my 10 Tips For Renting A House

1. Thoroughly researching the neighbourhood.

The most important factor to look out for while hunting for a rented apartment in any are is to research the neighbourhood and to find a little (however much possible) about the neighbours. It always serves well to know what kind of people you will be interacting with and what type of locality you would be living in.

2. Careful inspection of the property

Always make sure to make thorough inspection of the property you are planning to rent. If the property has damages then you will either have to talk to the landlord to get it repaired or will have to at least make sure that the damage was already there before you moved in and preferably have it acknowledged by the landlord in writing.

Also, it will help you to negotiate or barter for the rent of the place.

3. Understanding the local landlord-tenant laws

Mostly the laws are universal, but there are some minor changes in landlord-tenant laws depending on the locality you want to rent a place in. Whenever it comes to legalities relating to property, whether it is for renting or buying, one can never be too careful.

4. Budget consideration

You need to make sure that you have studied the rent pricing in all the areas that you are considering for renting a place in. Pick the one that sits comfortable in your budget as most probably you’ll be paying for additional and unforeseen expenses in the process of moving in and settling in the new place. So it is always better to get a place under your budget so as not to end up in financial trouble with unforeseen expenses.

Also, the pricing depends on the rise or fall of the real estate market (which greatly depends on the world as well as national economy.)

The pricing of apartments greatly depend on the kind of apartment you are looking for as well as the area it is situated in. For example, the average rent for a 1-bedroom apartment in Norfolk, VA is currently $949. This is a 11% decrease compared to the previous year.

Zumper

5. Understanding the lease terms

It is imperative to properly go through and understand the lease terms of your landlord because once the lease is signed, you won’t be able to change or negotiate later. So make sure to thoroughly check the lease terms (more than twice) and making sure to request changes if necessary before finalising the place and signing the lease.

6. Looking into renter’s insurance

Renters insurance can help you repair or replace property after loss due to many types of damage or theft. It can also provide coverage for an accident at your residence. Policies usually have very affordable annual premiums. Note that your landlord’s property insurance doesn’t cover your belongings.

Farmers.com

This is self-evident and everyone must have a renter’s insurance to protect them against unforeseen circumstances.

7. Establishing a good relationship with your landlord

It is always important to spend a considerable time in getting to know them better. You must maintain a healthy and friendly relationship with your landlord in order to make sure that your life in their rented place is peaceful and without difficulties. If there is any problem you can always talk to them and seek a solution rather than fighting with the. Never antagonise your landlord because it can end up in making your stay in the rented place a living nightmare.

8. Accessibility to and from

You don’t want to get stuck in a place that is too far away from your work, your partner’s work or your children/sibling’s school. Accessibility to and from your workplace has to be considered while looking for a rented place. Also, accessibility to the local supermarket, gas station, schools, vets, hospital and other such places of importance should be considered before finalising any agreement.

Another thing to consider is the accessibility to public transport, especially if you or anyone in your family use public transport on a regular basis.

So these are the tips that I can guarantee will help you in making the process of renting places in the US simple and organised.

Fiction Writing Basics – 5-Day Online Workshop

Hello dear readers and writers, after some exhausting and mentally strenuous months, I am back with another workshop.

Fiction Writing Basics – 5-Day Workshop

Last year I conducted multiple batches of Fiction Writing Masterclass and Creative Writing workshops and the one thing I noticed in all of the students was that most of them did not know how to write and where to begin. Keeping this in mind, I wanted to start the workshops for this year with the most basic course, spread over 5 days so that the students can get enough time to not only learn, but to understand, implement and discuss each and every topic.

When I say students, I mean all the people who attend my class – right from 15-year old teenagers to 80-year old professors, I teach everyone whoever is interested in learning writing.

I implore you to read through my bio and profile to know exactly why you should learn from me, a self-taught award-winning fiction writer.

Details:

  • Date: 3rd May to 7th May 2021 (Mon to Fri)
  • Fees: Rs.1000 per person (10% off for old students)
  • Medium: Online
  • Platform: Google Meet
  • Study Material: Notes will be provided
  • Duration: 2 hours on all 5 days
  • Critique of exercises: Peer critique (all homework & exercises will be discussed in the class)

Topics:

DaysTopics
Day-1
3rd May’2021 – Monday
Introduction to Creative Writing & Fiction Writing
Genres in literature
Discovering The Writer Within
Ways of writing and the best way to write
WHAT to write – finding and developing ideas
Important Terminologies
Important Literary Devices
Writer’s Block
Writing Styles
Literary Themes
Day-2
4th May’2021 – Tuesday
Understanding Drafts
Importance of First Draft & Second Draft
Exposition, Narration & Point Of Views
Rules of Fiction
Elements Of Fiction Writing
Tools Of Fiction Writing
External conflict & POVs
Understanding Plotting a story
Elements of Plot Structure
Aristotle’s Basic Story Structure
3 Traditional Plot Structures
Day-3
5th May’2021- Wednesday
Characterisation basics
Types of different characters
Character as per their narrative function
Character arcs
Inner Conflicts
Character Motivation and Stakes
Character Backstory
Profiling the characters
Day-4
6th May’2021 – Thursday
My Story Framework
Show, don’t Tell technique
Dialogue writing basics
Understanding Pacing & Tension
Structuring a scene
Conflict, Resolution and Ending
Self-Revising and Self-Editing
Day-5
7th May’2021- Friday
How to improve your writing
Reading to improve your writing
Writing-Related Concepts
– Freewriting
– Morning Words or Pages
– Blank Page Syndrome
– Prompt-Writing
– Idea Journal
Biggest Insecurities faced by Writers & Security Blanket For Writers
Using MindMapping and Brainstorming to write

Extra Perks!

  • Detailed Study Material will be provided
  • 60 Writing Prompts for you to write and practice
  • 50-traits Caracter Profile Sheet
  • 50% off on my Online Writing Consultation Service (for one hour consultation)
  • 20% off on Manuscript Critique Service (1 critique)
  • 1 month access to my Blog’s Monthly Subscription Service. To read more about this, please visit my website: http://www.crazycatwriter.com

Registration & Payment:

The fee for this course is Rs.1000 per person. There is a 10% discount for my old students – people who have previously attended at least one of my paid workshops.

Please register yourself for this workshop here: Registration.

Once you re registered for the course, you will receive the payment details and further details via email.

What Is Camp NaNo WriMoWriMo?

If you are writer who’s even mildly active on social media then you might have heard about the NaNoWriMo – National Novel Writing Month. But what about Camp NaNoWriMo?

Camp NaNoWriMo is a spinoff of NaNoWriMo which you can customise as per your own needs. In their own words:

Camp NaNoWriMo is your next, great writing adventure! Every April and July, take the chance to do something new with your writing… with all the flexibility that Camp offers. You can set your own writing goal (you’re not locked into 50,000 words!), and work on any writing project, novel or not.

Camp NaNo Website

It has no restrictions of word count so you can look at it as a flexible NaNoWriMo.
It is good for all writers, especially for those who are new to this format of writing because of the flexibility it offers. You can writer either 10K words of 100K – there is absolutely no word count limit (minimum or maximum.)

You can sign up for Camp Nano here and join the most awesome writing community on the planet. This would be my 8th year, and I will be working on the proof of Sinister Town for this April’s Camp Nano.

So what are you waiting for? Going Camp NaNoWriMo today and get started on your writing project. You can even join writing groups there or create one of your own.

Are you participating in Camp NaNoWriMo April 2021?

My Author Introduction: Heena R. Pardeshi

Finally, I got around to creating a video for my author introduction post. Do check it out and let me know how it is?

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