3rd Edition Of Writing Manifesto Is Here!

Hello dear readers, I have a brilliant news to share!

The 3rd edition of Writing Manifesto is here (and to be honest, it looks so good!) For those of you who haven’t been initiated – Writing Manifesto is a mini e-book full of writing inspiration for new writers. If you are just starting out then it would be a great boost for your moral and will definitely make you feel less ‘shitty’ about having to defend yourself as a writer.

When I started my writing journey, I remember coming across such a book and it helped me tremendously. I even printed out a page of it that had a couple of good lines and pinned it just above my writing desk. It made me feel like I wasn’t alone and that there is at least one person who ‘gets’ what I was going through. So it was a great boost for my confidence and it kept me going till I finished my first book! So then I decided to create something similar for my readers and audience too. So here it is!

And the best part is, it is completely free!

But in order to download it, you’ll have to subscribe to my Newsletter. Now don’t give me that look… I know how much everyone dreads spammy emails, and I hate it even more so as I receive hundreds of them in a week. So trust me I am NOT going to spam you. Tell you what, I send out Newsletters very infrequently, say 2-3 per year. That is only when I have something of importance or relevance to share. I am way past the stage of sending out monthly emails where writers fill up space with crappy talks and useless content. So no need to worry ๐Ÿ™‚

And the process hardly take one minute!

So, what are you waiting for?

Subscribe to my Newsletter here:

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And enjoy the free e-book.

Don’t forget to let me know what you think about it or if it helped you in feeling motivated to write in any way. I would love to know what you thought about it ๐Ÿ™‚

Thank you and have a safe week ahead!

Registrations Now Open For Webinar #2: Introduction To Novel Writing

Webinar #2

Hello readers, after the success of my first Webinar (where I got to connect with a lot of new writers), I am very glad to announce the details of the second Webinar. As most of the writers who attended my last webinar were interested in learning more about novel writing, I have decided to go for Novel Writing for my next Webinar.

Webinar #2: An Introduction To Novel Writing

Introduction To Novel Writing webinar will be a 30 to 45 mins Live Facebook event on my Facebook Page on 24th May 2020, starting at 7:00 PM.

In this Webinar I will be covering the following topics:

  • Determining the writer within 
  • Finalising on a trustworthy idea for your novel
  • The best way to approach and write the ‘much dreaded’ First Draft of your novel
  • Different types of Story Structures and finding the best fit for your novel
  • Basic elements of novel writing
  • Writing the Second Draft of your novel
  • Guide to revising and editing 
  • Finishing your novel

I will be emailing you a copy of the Notes once the session would be over.It’ll have all the information I will be discussing along with a couple of exercises and tips on getting started with your novel and making sure that you finish it.

This session may extend to up to an hour as writing is very close to my heart and I have a tendency to lose track of time while talking about it. Though, I’ll make sure the session won’t go beyond an hour (unlike my last Webinar.) I will be sending you a reminder email half an hour before the session begins, i.e., at 6:30, so please be present 5 mins before the Webinar begins at 7:00 on 24th May 2020 (coming Sunday.)

This will be only if you fill the form below and register for the event as I will need your email id to send you a reminder email and then later on notes.

Registration for this webinar is closed. For new and upcoming webinars, please subscribe to my mailing list and I’ll keep you posted.

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Different Types Of Editing

Editing is the process in which a manuscript is modified, corrected and polished thoroughly. In the literary world, there are different kinds of editing. Editing is very subjective, depending upon what exactly is lacking or needs improvement regarding the overall quality of the individual manuscript. For example, in some manuscript, prose needs tightening, whereas in the other the overall plot-structure needs to be fixed, or in some, the scenes are not executed well or the dialogues are lacking in quality, and so on. So the first job of an editor is to determine (based on the sample chapters they are provided by the writer) to determine which kind of editing does their work needs.

Editing is the process of correcting and polishing the manuscript in order to make it stand out.

To understand this better, the editing can be categorised as following::

  • Substantive Editing
  • Developmental Editing
  • Mechanical Editing
  • Line Editing
  • Copy Editing

Now, let’s take a look at the definition of all the types of editing listed above and try and understand them better:

  1. Editingย (in the overall sense): Editing involves minor changes that polish your manuscript technically by focusing on the sentence structure, punctuations, spelling mistakes, typos, grammatical errors, pointing out mistakes in the already revised text. While editing, the overall story remains the same.
    Here, โ€˜fixingโ€™ the manuscriptโ€™s structure, as well as the overall plot, is the priority.
  2. Copy Editing: Copyediting, commonly known as line editing, is a light form of editing that lends a professional polish to a book. The editor reviews your work, fixing any mechanical errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation.
    Copyediting is the least-expensive version of editing. Some professionals divide copyediting and line editing into two separate edits, copyediting being the lighter, grammar-only edit, and line editing being a more intense look at each sentenceโ€™s meaning.
  3. Line Editing: Line editing is often used interchangeably with the term copyediting. However, when it is distinguished from copyediting, it refers to a unique edit that falls between copyediting and developmental editing in intensity. In line editing, the editor looks at your book line by line and analyses each and every sentence.
    The editor considers word choice and the power and meaning of a sentence. The editor considers the syntax and whether a sentence needs to be trimmed or tightened. Line editing helps in making the prose sing.
  4. Mechanical Editing: Mechanical editing refers to the application of a particular style, such as The Chicago Manual of Style or Associated Press (AP) Style. The editor looks at punctuation, capitalisation, spelling, abbreviations, and any other style rules.
    Mechanical editing is sometimes included in copyediting.
  5. Substantive Editing: Substantive editing considers a workโ€™s organisation and presentation. It involves tightening and clarifying at a chapter, scene, paragraph, and sentence level.
    Unlike developmental editing, which covers the big-picture issues and deep-level restructuring, substantive editing deals with the actual prose. Substantive editing is sometimes referred to as line editing and can also be confused with developmental editing. Always check with your editor and put in writing what his or her services cover, regardless of the term used.
  6. Developmental Editing: The developmental editor looks deeply at the organisation and strength of a book. Think big picture. The editor considers everything from pacing to characters, point of view, tense, plot, subplots, and dialogue. Weak links are exposed and questioned. The editor scrutinises order, flow, and consistency.
    He asks questions such as: Is this the right number of chapters? Are the chapters and paragraphs in the right order? Are there any places in the book where the pacing lags? Is there a hole in the information or story presented? Are the characters likeable? Developmental editing considers all the aspects of a manuscript that make the book readable and enjoyable.
    Because of the extensive nature of this form of editing, it is more time-intensive and costly. However, it is worth the investment if you are serious about succeeding as an author.

So these are the types of manuscript editing a writer has to inevitably come face-to-face with, at some point or the other, in their writing journey. So it is always advisable to know these terms before you deal with an editor who might expect you to already know about them. Or better yet, it might save you from a trap if, god-forbid, you end up with an editor who doesn’t know what they are doing (believe me, there are a lot of people who just do things for the sake of it, and of course also for the money.) So educate yourself well, before negotiating any kind of deal with an editor especially while self-publishing.

Stream Here: Webinar On Introduction To Creative Writing Basics

Hey guys, if you’d like to watch the Webinar stream of my webinar on Introduction To Creative Writing Basics, then you can watch the entire thing on my YouTube channel (or below.) I have also started taking private classes on Creative Writing and Novel Writing, so if you are interested, then shoot me an email on rathoreheena@gmail.com, and I’ll be happy to share the details.

This is the recording of the Live Facebook Stream of my Webinar On Introduction To Creative Writing Basics. It was a great session with around 11-20 participants (the numbers kept on changing as it was an hour + live session, but it was extremely interactive. The webinar actually begins after the first 10-15 minutes (As I was testing and waiting for everyone to come online for that part.) The session is a bit slow because I had to keep a tab on the comments and questions the viewers were posting and had to pace myself accordingly. Though I hope that you’ll enjoy this lecture and learn the basics of creative writing from it.

As an additional aid, you can download this lecture’s notes from my drive here.

Do let me know if there’s any particular topic you’d like me to discuss in my next Webinar/Lecture.

Thanks for being here.