5 Keys To Writing 50K Words In 30 Days

NaNoWriMo is just around the corner and everyone is going nuts preparing for it. And why the hell not? It’s the biggest writing project or festival of the year! well, at least for the creative writing community.

For those living under the rock, NaNoWriMo is an annual, Internet-based creative writing project that takes place during the month of November. Participants attempt to write a 50,000-word manuscript between November 1 and November 30.
– Wiki

In the year 2014, I participated in NaNoWriMo for the first time and having no idea how to write so much in 30 days I failed miserably with less than 2000 words. It was my very first attempt to write my first book (or for that matter to write anything substantial.) That year I hated NaNoWriMo from the bottom of my heart and decided never to take part in it ever again. Sigh… If writers are one thing, it’s dramatic.

Anyway, after a few months, I came to know about JuNoWriMo and decided to give it a try as it is not as hyped as NaNoWriMo and thought “What the heck.” Failing in NaNoWriMo 2014 helped me understand my weaknesses. So I chalked out a rough plan and went headfirst with a bowl of determination and a solid outline for my novel. And… I not only completed the first draft of my book with 52K words but also developed a habit of writing 2K per day.

After that the very next month I took part in Camp NaNoWriMo in July 2015 and won it with 64K words! It was the second draft for Deceived. Since then I’ve been writing 1K per day (on and off), which is actually quite good according to many big writers. Still, I try to write more whenever possible.

In this journey from 0 to 1-3K words per day, I learned a lot of lessons. Now I always look forward to all the NaNoWriMos, Camp NaNos and JuNos every year because today I have something that I didn’t have that first year, and that is confidence. Now I know what it really takes to get 50K+ words in 30K. And to help others who are struggling to get those dreaded 50K words done this NaNoWriMo, I’ve come up with 5 keys that are the most important factors for cracking NaNoWriMo and even to write a good amount of words daily even after NaNo.

5 Keys To Write 50K Words Within 30 Days

1. Planning:

I used to think that I was pantster, but it took me almost 8 months of pantsing to realize that I’m a hardcore plotter. Pantsing is not something that people really understand. Most of the people like to believe that they are one because pantsing does not require any preparations. They think that it is easy. But what they don’t know is that pantsing is not as easy as it seems. You really need to be a hardcore spur-of-the-moment pantster otherwise you’ll be staring at a blank screen for most of the time.
If you are struggling with your writing then more than 90% chances are either you think you are a pantster or your planning is falling short. Now when I say planning I’m not talking only about outlining your novel. No, planning also includes deciding or preparing a plan about what all you need to get done in the next 30 days. It can be as easy as making a simple bullet point list of stuff you need to get in NaNoWriMo.
Remember, the more you plan the easier it will be for you to write. At least, you won’t be facing the “Blank Screen Syndrome” and wondering “What the heck should I do now?”

Being a hardcore planster, I do a LOT of planning when it comes to my novels. For poetry, I write by the seat of my pants. It takes a lot of time, discipline and patience to plan your novel, so do a bit of research before you start planning and learn some tricks of the trades such as Character Profile Sheets, the 3-Act StructureFreewriting, First Drafts, different Point Of Views, the concept of Writer’s Block and Naming The Writer’s Unconscious and the difference between Editing & Revising.

Word of Advice: If you ever feel stuck somewhere you can try mind mapping and brainstorming.

Read my article on Being A Planster at Portobello Book Blog.

 

2. Setting Goals:

Just setting a simple aim or a deadline won’t work if you really want to hack this 50K code. You need to really think the goals through. Anyone can do the math to know the average word count they need to write daily in order to complete the 50K limit done in 30 days.. but how can you be so sure that you’ll be writing each and every day for the next 30 days?
My advice (at least to novices) is to keep at least 4 off days, let’s call them Zero Word Days – ZWDs, while planning because you’d need at least 4 days off if you want to write efficiently, especially when you’ve hardly written anything at all regularly before. I can write up to 1K to 3K words daily, even in non-NaNo months, still, I prefer keeping 4 ZWDs because it’s always better to be prepared for the worst.

And get this, even if you don’t need all the 4 ZWDs, you’ll only end up writing more than 50K the way I ended up writing 64K words for Camp NaNoWriMo 2015. So instead of having a goal of 1.6K per day (50K/30), try writing 2K per day. That way even if you don’t feel the need for any ZWDs then you’ll be writing 50K in just 26 days.

If you feel that you are under some sort of writing pressure, then use one of your 4 ZWD and take that day off (if you’re following my way then you have the absolute liberty to take it easy and enjoy for 4 days.) Go out and watch a movie. DO NOT sit in front of the laptop and sulk watching other’s progress because it will lead to writer’s block. Just relax and forget about writing for a day. The next day you’ll be surprised to see that you’ll be ready to write again and that too with a renewed sense of excitement.

Sticking to the word count is great, but never, and I mean NEVER EVER, stop yourself from writing more than the everyday word limit. Someday you might feel like you can have a 3K day or a 5K day and maybe even 10K day. Do it! Whatever you do don’t stop. And from the next day do what you’ve been doing earlier. Stick to the word count. The idea is not to write less than 2K.

 

3. Writing In Intervals Or Slots:

I love this way of writing and I prefer to call it SLOTTING. I’m not sure about everyone, but so far I’ve interacted with more than a hundred authors and what I’ve gathered so far is that writing in slots is always better, and even more effective, than writing in one sitting. Now there are exceptions but I’m talking about the most common cases.

For slotting, you can write either in word-slots or in time-slots:

  • Word-slots – In one sitting I can easily write 1K. So, if I sit 3 times a day to write my novel or any other project for that matter, I can easily write 3K a day. And that is exactly what I do. I always settle for 2-3 slots a day. Morning, afternoon and/or evening. This way I can write without stressing out and can easily get other stuff done too.
  • Time-slots – If you want to write in time slots, then start with 1/2-hour slots, 2-3 times a day, no matter how much you write, but at the end of the day make sure to complete the minimum number of words you’ve set as your daily target.

If you are a beginner and want to write 2K per day like I explained in the previous point, then you can go about it like this: Write 500 words in one sitting, 4 times a day. But 4 times is a lot, isn’t it? So what you can do is write 500 words, then take a 20-minute break. Do not write in these 20 minutes. You can either read something or do a house chore or better yet take a nap! Then after 20 minutes write another 500 words. Repeat this in the evening. This way you’ll be writing 2K per day very easily.

 

4. Determination:

This is where most of the people balk, especially in the long run. You really need to be determined about writing and completing your goals. Don’t let anything or anyone come in the way of your writing. Write like your ass is on fire and the only way to save it is by writing… Just write!

If you’re struggling with a particular scene, then leave it and move on to the other one before you get irritated and stop writing altogether. If you like quotes then I’d suggest you write some of your favourite ones on a post-it or a note card and put them up on the wall just above (or next to) your writing desk, where you can see them while writing.
If you feel like quitting, think about why you started writing in the first place.

Also, you’ll have to be determined to achieve all the goals you’ll set for yourself. Instead of focusing on writing 50K within 30 days, try and focus on writing 2K every day (or whatever your goal is.) This will make all the difference.

 

5. Prioritising:

Ah… Now, this is an important one. Sometimes we get so excited about writing that we totally forget about other things and just write madly. It’s okay to do this if you have some really great idea that you just can’t miss, but doing this, again and again, is not as good an idea as you might think. Trust me, it’s not a healthy practice. If you choose to go on like this, then sooner or later you’ll be overwhelmed and develop a writer’s block. And we don’t want that, do we? The only solution to this problem is to prioritize.

Remember, each and everything is important. If you’re writing that doesn’t mean that you have an excuse to leave the house dirty or make other family members do your work. Nope, it’s not acceptable. Once in a while, it is okay but being a writer is not about writing in November only. You have to write each and every day of the year, so set aside time for everything that you are supposed to do. Remember you won’t get the time, you’ll have to make it.

Writing is your craft, your love; don’t make it a punishment for others.

I’m a fitness freak so along with all the house chores and writing I need at least an extra hour for my walking, jogging and yoga. So, I get up at 6:00 am and make it a point to finish my exercise and yoga routines by 8:00. And then I carry on with my day like any normal day.
So, all you need to do is prioritize stuff and make sure that you do all the necessary things.


Note: All the pictures used in this articles have been taken from Pixabay unless stated otherwise.
Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Losing My Brother

This poem is written for the photo prompt at Describli.

Before you start reading the poem, I’d like to say that I’m no poet. I just write whatever comes to my mind and whenever it does.

I hope you’ll like this poem as it is really very close to my heart.


 

IMG_6008-317x159

Losing My Brother

I could hear their marching feet,

The unyielding boots on the harsh cold ground,

The chilling winds carrying their beastly sounds.

*

I wanted to run away and hide, or better yet fly,

But I froze on the cursed land… Why, oh why?

*

They came towards me, weapons of destruction in their hands,

The mud getting loose under their heavy weight.

*

The small babe, that was my brother, gave a loud cry,

squirming and crying under the torn-up cloth in my hand.

*

They came forward and shoved me hard on the ground,

Making my brother fall  on the damned dirt of this ruined land,

They snatched him from my hands and took him away from me.

*

I can see him crying and twitching to be near me,

To be wrapped in the warmth of my love and care.

But they didn’t have an ear for us, as they turned their pathetic backs on me

And off they went.

His sorrowful wailing cries tearing at my heart and soul.

*

I lied there waiting for a miracle to happen

but, sadly, there was none…


Word Of The Week (WOW #35)

Hi guys,

WOW-2Word Of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. (me.)

It’s a fun way to improve one’s vocabulary by learning new words every week.

If you want to participate then simply do a post with your WORD and leave the link to your post as a comment on one of my WOW post.

Here’s this week’s WOW:

Word:

Gingerly

Part Of Speech:

Adjective

Derivatives:

  • Gingerliness – noun

Pronunciation:

  • /ˈdʒɪndʒəli/
  • gin-ger-ly
  • Audio

Meaning:

  • In a careful or cautious manner.
  • Showing great care or caution.

Synonyms:

Alert, cautious, chary, circumspect, guarded, heedful, wary.

Antonyms:

Careless, heedless, unmindful, unsafe, unwary, recklessly.

Word Origin:

Early 16th century (in the sense ‘daintily, mincingly’): perhaps from Old French gensor‘delicate’, comparative of gent ‘graceful’, from Latin genitus ‘(well-) born’.

Usage Note:

None.

Use In Sentences:


I hope you guys like this word and hope it’s useful to you in some or the other way! If you want to check out more words like this, then visit my page:

Word Treasure


Featured Reviewer At NetGalley (NetGalley Blogger Spotlight: The Reading Bud)

HEENA R. PARDESHI

I’m the featured reviewer at NetGalley for my book blog, The Reading Bud, for their monthly series, Blogger Spotlight, for Mystery & Thriller edition.

I was really excited when I received a mail from NetGalley inviting me for this spotlight. I really enjoyed answering each and every question for this interview and consider myself lucky to be interviewed by and featured at NetGalley’s blog!

You can read my interview here.

If you’re wondering what NetGalley is or if you want to know how to get accepted for the books by some of the biggest publishers in the world, then you can read my article: Are You A “Professional Reader” At NetGalley.

If you’re already a NetGalley member then do check out this month’s Mystery & Thriller reads as there are some amazing books this month. The best one being Ashley Bell by Dean Koontz. And did you know…

View original post 22 more words

Featured Reviewer At NetGalley (NetGalley Blogger Spotlight: The Reading Bud)

I’m the featured reviewer at NetGalley for my book blog, The Reading Bud, for their monthly series, Blogger Spotlight, for Mystery & Thriller edition.

I was really excited when I received a mail from NetGalley inviting me for this spotlight. I really enjoyed answering each and every question for this interview and consider myself lucky to be interviewed by and featured at NetGalley’s blog!

You can read my interview here.

Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 12.57.43 pm
A snapshot of my interview at NetGalley’s blog

If you’re wondering what NetGalley is or if you want to know how to get accepted for the books by some of the biggest publishers in the world, then you can read my article: Are You A “Professional Reader” At NetGalley.

If you’re already a NetGalley member then do check out this month’s Mystery & Thriller reads as there are some amazing books this month. The best one being Ashley Bell by Dean Koontz. And did you know that NetGalley has introduced the Horror genre category as well!? How amazing is that!

Hope you guys are having a great week.

Word Of The Week (WOW#34)

Hi guys,

WOW-2Word Of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. (me.)

It’s a fun way to improve one’s vocabulary by learning new words every week.

If you want to participate then simply do a post with your WORD and leave the link to your post as a comment on one of my WOW post.

Here’s this week’s WOW:

Word:

Fractious

Part Of Speech:

Adjective

Derivatives:

  • Fractiously – adverb
  • Fractiousness – noun

Pronunciation:

  • /ˈfrakʃəs/
  • frac-tious
  • Audio

Meaning:

  • Causing trouble : hard to manage or control or tending to be troublesome : unruly.
  • Full of anger and disagreement.
  • Irritable and quarrelsome.

Synonyms:

Grumpy, grouchy, bad-tempered, ill-tempered, ill-natured, uncontrollable, undisciplined, rebellious.

Antonyms:

Contended, affable, dutiful.

Word Origin:

Late 17th century: from fraction, probably on the pattern of the pair factionfactious .

Usage Note:

None

Related idioms and phrases:

  • Having got out of bed the wrong side
  • Badgering someone
  • As cross as two sticks
  • Like a bear with a sore head
  • Out of hand

Use In Sentences:

  • There children are quite fractious.article-0-0C2C3A1B00000578-780_634x480
  • The National Olympic Committee has to hold its fractious members together.
  • She agreed to take part in the dance competition fractiously.
  • His fractiousness repels me.person-804035_640

I hope you guys like this word and hope it’s useful to you in some or the other way! If you want to check out more words like this, then visit my page:

Word Treasure


Converting Files to E-Books

I’m well aware that all the Scrivener users are probably feeling smug right now, but in no time even the non-scrivener-folks will be full of smugness just like you fancy pants.

I know firsthand how irritating it can be after you’ve finished your MS and you don’t know how to convert it into a readable e-book format. It is really annoying to not be able to read your precious book on your e-reader after all the handwork you’ve put in it. After months (or years) of waiting, it’s only fair to be able to read your book as an e-book. But how?

After a little bit of research on the internet, I finally came up with a permanent solution.  Ta-da! I found a great free software that can be easily downloaded and quickly installed and can be used offline. It converts the files pretty quickly and you can choose from quite a huge variety of e-book formats.

This amazing software is CALIBRE. (You can download it here.)

It is a one-stop solution for e-book management and works beautifully. You can visit their page and easily download the software for Windows as well as MacBooks.

Converting files with Calibre is not only hassle-free but also extremely quick.

Step-by-step guide to convert a file to various e-book formats:

  1. Download and install Calibre from here.
  2. Open Calibre by double clicking on it’s icon.
    Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 12.30.02 pm
    Calibre icon

    Calibre home screen
    Calibre home screen
  3. Click on ‘Add books’ and select the file that you want to convert into an e-book.
    Here I’m selecting the .doc file of my book, but you can choose a file in any format.

    Select your book or any other file you want
    Select your book or any other file you want
  4. Now, after the book is added to Calibre’s library (it takes only 3 seconds), select the book and click on ‘Convert books’ icon.Take two minutes and observe the window that appears on the screen. Do not rush because this is where you’ll select the format, book name, series name (if any), author name, publisher name, cover design, and other crucial stuff.Screen Shot 2015-10-02 at 11.32.20 am
  5. After filling up all the required fields select the desired format (epub, mobi or any one from the long list) from the top right corner of this window. After selecting the format click on ‘OK.’
    It takes around 10 seconds (or less) to convert your book/file into the selected format. GO to step-6 if you’ve converted in your desired format. But, if you want to convert the book into more than one format, select the same file again from home window and convert it to desired format. Don’t worry at this point because all the converted books will be saved under one folder only.
  6. Now to check the book(s) right click on the file in the library and select ‘Show in folder.’ There will be a folder with your name (author name) in the window that pops up. Open it and there you’ll have another folder with your book name and in that you’ll have your book/file in the format(s) you selected along with the original copy.
    Folder with author name
    Folder with author name
    Folder with book name
    Folder with book name

    My book in the formats I selected (mobi, epub and txt)
    My book in the formats I selected (mobi, epub and txt)

There you have it, your file or book converted into various e-book formats. To get it on your reading device, simply copy the appropriate format and paste it in your device or transfer it via DropBox.

Here’s my book on Kindle (it’s the un-edited copy I created for a few author friends to get their testimony):

I hope you’ll find this article helpful. Let me know if you have any questions or doubts.

Did you already know about Calibre or do you use any other software to convert files? Please share your thoughts and suggestions in the comments below.


All the images used in this article are my own, except for the featured image.

Featured Image Source: Pixabay

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Word Of The Week (WOW #33)

Hi guys,

WOW-2Word Of the Week (WOW) is a weekly meme created by Heena Rathore P. (me.)

It’s a fun way to improve one’s vocabulary by learning new words every week.

If you want to participate then simply do a post with your WORD and leave the link to your post as a comment on one of my WOW post.

Here’s this week’s WOW:

Word:

Exalt

Part Of Speech:

Verb

Derivatives:

  • Exaltedly – adverb
  • Exalter – noun

Pronunciation:

  • /ɪɡˈzɔːlt,ɛɡ-/
  • ex-alt
  • Audio

Meaning:

  • To raise (someone or something) to a higher level.
  • To praise (someone or something) highly.
  • To present (something) in a way that is very favourable or too favourable.

Synonyms:

Glorify, extol, praise, magnify, elevate.

Antonyms:

Demean, degrade, abase, humiliate.

Word Origin:

Late Middle English: from Latin exaltare, from ex- ‘out, upward’ + altus ‘high’.

Usage Note:

Do not confuse exalt with exult.

Exult: Show or feel triumphant elation or jubilation.

Use In Sentences:

  • The party will continue to exalt their hero.
  • These paintings exalt the imagination.

    Image Source: Pinterest
    Image Source: Pinterest

I hope you guys like this word and hope it’s useful to you in some or the other way! If you want to check out more words like this, then visit my page:

Word Treasure


10 Essential Tools For Writers

Every writer needs a certain set of tools in order to write. And, trust me, it’s not as simple as to just pick up a notebook and write. It might be for some writers (mostly intuitive writers,) but for most of us, there is a need for much more than just a pen and paper.

If you wish to become a professional writer then there are some things that you need in order to get started and some things that you need in order to help you write consistently, making it not feel like a task. For this I have come up with a list of 10 things that any writer who wants to write regularly must have.

Out of these some things you’ll need right away, while some things you can get over the course of time, so don’t think that you need these tools to begin writing. You just need them to be able to write regularly. Especially if you are planning to write a book or a story.

Following is my list of 15 Essential Tools for Writers that are a must for any writer who wants to write professionally and hopefully full-time someday.

10 ESSENTIAL TOOLS FOR WRITERS

1. PERSONAL WRITING MACHINE:

These are my writing machines – The silver one is my first ever personal laptop and hence I refuse to part from it. The grey one is my new one and the one I presently use. 

The first and most important thing a writer needs in order to write is a writing machine. A lot of people are of the opinion that writing can be done on a simple notebook and that they don’t need a machine for it. I agree with the first part of that statement, but not with the second one. Here’s why – imagine writing a 60K-80K words long novel in a bunch of notebooks and then having to TYPE the entire thing just because no publisher would accept your handwritten manuscript. 

You see the point, yet?

You can write in a notebook, no question about it, but the thing is at some point you’ll have to type the entire thing, so why to waste all that time (or money in case you get a professional to do it for you) when you can simply type your notebook. If you are serious about your writing then I am sorry to break it to you but you need to type it on a computer/laptop or tablet. And no, you can’t use a phone to write your pieces simply because it’ll be a nightmare for your eyes as well as your mind after the first couple of thousand words.

So what you need is a personal writing machine. Why I say ‘personal’ is because you will have a lot of files, a lot of document, folders and pictures related only to your writings to be having to share your machine with anyone. Having said that, you absolutely do not need an expensive machine, you can go for a basic 2nd hand laptop too. All you need is a personal writing machine which you can use to write.

If you are planning to buy a new machine then I’d highly recommend MacBook Air.

2. WRITING SOFTWARE:

Now that you’ve got your own machine, the next thing you’ll need is writing software. Why I have it here at the 2nd place is because as a writer you’ll be spending a lot of time using it, so make sure that you explore all your options and choose wisely. 

There are tons of writing software in the market these days, but the most popular one that is used by most writers is Scrivener. It is a one-time buy and you can totally get it but I don’t use it myself as I find it too complicated to be worrying about while working on my writing. I’d recommend it to writers who are planning to write fantasy novels because it has some great planning tools and most of the self-published writers swear by it as it compiles the book and produces it in any desired e-book format.

But, if you are a beginner and find it better to use simple things (like me) then go for the most basic ones:

  • Microsoft Word for Windows
  • Pages for MacBook

I personally use a 50-50 mix of Pages and Word as it serves me well. I do the initial drafts on Pages and the later ones on Word as my editor uses it. Also, in the latest versions of both these softwares, you can compile the document into e-book formats. So better start simple.

3. NOTEBOOKS OR JOURNALS:

Having a writing machine is never enough, trust me. There will be times when you’d want to either write down your ideas or develop them in longhand. So you do need notebooks or journals with you. 

If you are a beginner and don’t know what kind of notebook or journal you may need then go for simpler ones. If you buy expensive notebooks or journals you’d face a form of writer’s block that will prevent you from ruining a good notebook/journal. So buy the rough ones in which you can squiggle easily and won’t mind if you end up ruining them with you ‘not so good ideas.’

Also, try and maintain a Morning Words or Morning Pages journal and fill it with 200-500 words every morning. This brilliant writing advise is by Julia Cameron and she writes in detail on this in her book The Artist’s Way.

4. Reading Material:

If you want to be a writer, you’ll have to read. Read all the book you can get your hands on, especially the genre you want to write in. But don’t get too stuck over on genres, try and read a mixture of books because reading teaches most of the things you need to know about writing. OS unless you read at least 3-4 books a month, you won’t get very far in your writing.

You can always buy books from shops or online or from sale or seconds. If you want to explore cheaper and better options then get e-books or a library membership. Also, there are millions of free books you can simply download and read on your laptop or phone if you don’t have an e-reader through websites like Project Gutenberg and Librivox.

Bottom line is that you NEED to read.

5. Language Guides:

If you don’t already have a guide for the language you write it, then get one today because grammar is one hell of a tough cow and at some point or the other you’ll need it for guidance. So better be prepared. As they say, practice makes one perfect and perfecting your grammar can go a really long way in helping you to improve your writing.

Again, a lot of people believe that they don’t need to be good in grammar for writing. You don’t have to be perfect, agreed, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t learn it to get better. You need to constantly grow as a writer and trust me, there is no bigger turn off than a writer with poor grammar, no matter what language you write in.

6. Writing References:

Being a writer is a tough job and one needs to constantly keep on learning and growing in order to get better at their craft. Writing talent is a gift, but the craft of writing and the skill of a writer has to be learned and constantly improved. Any art form is a learning curve and so is writing, the sooner you accept it the sooner you can learn to allow yourself to grow and become better. And the best way to learn this amazing and multi-faceted craft is to read writing references on writing.

Some of the best books on writing that I recommend to all my students are:

7. Printer:

Every writer has a thing for the printed words. Whether you have already realised this or not, but chances are you would be completely exhilarated to see the words you’ve written printed on an A4 sheet of paper in a font of your liking. Personally, it gives me a kick and love, absolutely and shamelessly, seeing my work in print. Therefore, if you want to be a serious writer I would advise you to get a printer as it gets very handy to print out your work even at midnight.

Also, there’s a more technical reason for this, it always helps to edit better in print. Even if you just want to revise a draft or proofread it, printing it out would give you far better results.

You don’t have to get it right away, but do start looking for a good fit for your writing. I would recommend getting a black and white printer. I use an HP Laserjet printer, even though I have a colour Deskjet.

8. Internet Connection:

A writer needs the internet more than anyone will ever care to admit. It is not only necessary for writing-related research but is also needed in order to create and establish your social media platforms. Now again, there will be a lot of differing opinions on this, but if you want to be a professional writer you have to get your ‘out there’ and for that internet is the best possible tool.

If you are a beginner, I’d highly suggest starting your own writing blog and posting there regularly, interacting with the blogging community as well as with the writing community in general over at Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. As a writer, you need to have, if not a very significant, then at least somewhat strong social media presence.

You can get a broadband connection or a WiFi connection whatever floats your boat. I personally prefer and use WiFi.

9. BACKUP:

It is a sin to not have a backup of your work, at least the work you are proud of creating and that is worth saving. Especially if you’re working on a book, it gets very difficult to have to lose the work and then start over. It is simply the stuff of nightmares so start smart and back up before you burn your fingers.

There are enough horror stories in the online writing community about writers having lost entire manuscripts because of silly mistakes, out-of-the-blue glitches or their writing machines bailing out on them. Always backup your work.

The easiest and the cheapest way is to email it to yourself or using a simple Pendrives. You can even go for free online cloud storage such as Google Drive or Dropbox. Or you can invest in a hard drive or buy online cloud storage space. Anything works as long as you back up regularly.

10. STATIONERY SUPPLIES:

If you love writing then chances are that you love buying stationary. They both kinds of go hand in hand. I am a big-time stationary freak and love buying supplies as I hate the thought of running out of something. Being a writer is a good enough excuse for you to indulge in a little stationery splurge and get those cute little sticky post-its and the index cards that you like.

If you love writing then chances are that you love buying stationary. They both kind of go hand in hand. I am a big time stationary freak and love buying supplies as I hate the thought of running out of something. Being a writer is a good enough excuse for you to indulge in a little stationary splurge and get those cute little sticky post-its and the index cards that you like.

Some of the things that you need by your side while writing are:

  • Pens (in black, blue, red and green colours) and lead pencils
  • Compact notebooks or diaries
  • Index cards
  • Post-its
  • Whiteboard and markers
  • Tagboard and clips
  • Paper pins
  • Highlighters
  • Stapler & pins
  • Folders and files
  • Filofax
  • Scheduling calendar
  • Bullet Journal (if you’re into them)

Apart from these tools, there are a couple more that you might need:

  • Speech Recorder
  • Speech-to-text software
  • Whiteboard and/or tagboard
  • Headphones or earplugs or some good Bluetooth speakers
  • A good playlist – try some music that helps you write
  • Spectacles

So these are the 10 Essential Tools For Writers that I think every writer needs in order to write with ease on a day-to-day basis. Please feel free to add more to this list in the comments section below.

If you are planning to write regularly then do check out these articles cause they might help you get started: